Spring 2021 Courses

Undergraduate Courses

French Undergraduate Courses

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French 101: First Semester French

French 101 is intended for students with no previous study of French. Course goals focus on developing interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative skills and cultural awareness of the French-speaking world. Topics explored in the course include personal identity, daily life, youth culture, and education.

French 102: Second Semester French

French 102 is the continuation of French 101 and is intended for students with limited study of French (e.g., 1-2 years of high school level study). Course goals focus on developing interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative skills and cultural awareness of the French-speaking world. Topics explored in the course include travel, fashion, media, and housing.

French 203: Third Semester French

Oral practice and conversation, reading, grammar review, vocabulary expansion, creative writing in French. Lab programs stress comprehension of non-textbook material on life in France today. Prerequisite: French 102 or approp score on placement exam.

French 204: Fourth Semester French

Continuation of French 203 with more advanced materials.

Oral practice and conversation, reading, grammar review, vocabulary expansion, creative writing in French. This student-centered program engages the learner in textbook and non-textbook material focusing on life today in France and in the French-speaking world. Prerequisite: French 203 or appropriate score on placement exam.

French 211: French Literature and Interdisciplinary Studies

Credits: 4 Contact: Joshua Armstrong

Exploring Paris.

Taught in English.

French 228: Intermediate Language and Culture

Credits: 3-4 Contact: Névine El Nossery

In this writing-intensive course, students practice the types of writing tasks typical of courses in the major (composition, compte rendu, explication de texte), explore both traditional and evolving notions of culture in France and the francophone world, review grammar, and build vocabulary related to the cultural topics studied. Prerequisite: French 204 or French 227.

French 271: Introduction to Literary Analysis

Credits: 3-4 Contact: Jan Miernowski

An introduction to the terms and techniques of literary analysis, examining works of each genre (short story, poetry, theater and novel) from various time periods and areas of the francophone world. Prerequisite: French 228. There are currently eight (8) sections of French 271 scheduled for Fall 2016. All sections are available for honors credit.

Here’s a short video in case you’re on the fence about taking this excellent course:

https://youtu.be/7Z0wHSCzmNU

French 312: Advanced Composition and Conversation

Credits: 3 Contact: Heather Willis Allen

French 314: Contemporary Issues in Government, Organizations, and Enterprise

Cultural study of contemporary Francophone Africa, focusing on issues in government, organizations and enterprise. Exploration of cultural and professional relations between Francophone Africa and France, the European Union, and the United States.

Pre-Reqs: French 228 or 311 or 313 or cons inst

French 321: Introduction to Medieval, Renaissance, and Early Modern Literature

Introduction to important literary works from the medieval era to the French Revolution. Classes conducted in French.

French 322: Introduction to Literature of Modernity

Introduction to important literary works of modernity (from the French Revolution to the twenty-first century). Classes conducted in French.

French 347: Introduction to Medieval, Renaissance, and Early Modern Civilization

An introduction to the political, social, intellectual, artistic and literary development of French culture, from its origins to the French Revolution (1789).

French 348: Modernity Studies

An introduction to political, social, intellectual, artistic and literary developments in French and Francophone culture, within the time period from the French Revolution to the current era.

French 391: French for Reading Knowledge

Credits: 3 Contact: Anne Vila

Intensive grammar and reading for graduate students and undergraduates with little or no experience in French. Readings from appropriate texts in the humanities, sciences, social sciences. May not be counted toward L&S foreign language requirement. Does not count towards the French major.

Enroll Info: Not open to Fr

French 461: Love in French Literature

Credits: 3 Contact: Richard Goodkin

A study of how literature has evolved over the course of French history, in relation to a chosen topic.

Enroll Info: French 321 & 322 or cons inst

French 568: Materiality and Immateriality in sub-Saharan Africa

Credits: 3 Contact: Vlad Dima

This course explores representations of cultural artifacts (such as football jerseys), of immaterial beings (such as ghosts), and of philosophical ideas (such as Mbembe’s Afrique-qui-vient or “black reason”) across a variety of genres and mediums. The aim is to better understand the current state of African Subjectivity within the Global South, as well as within the North-South context. We will watch a number of contemporary films, read 21st century novels, engage with philosophy, theory, music, paintings, photography, and various diegetic objects.

Literature in Translation 302: What is Life?

Credits: 3 Contact: Jan Miernowski

Literature in Translation 360: French and Italian Renaissance Literature Online

A web-based course comprising 15 week-long units, organized as a virtual journey through Renaissance Italian and French cities. Each unit includes a lecture and readings from main literary texts and cultural documents associated with the city or region.

Pre-Reqs: None

Academic Advisor in French 

For new advisees, including those ready to fill out the form to declare the French Major or French Certificate, contact Ewa Miernowska

For continuing advisees, contact fritdept@letsci.wisc.edu

For placement scores and permission to enroll in ‘honors’ sections, contact Professor Heather Willis Allen

For questions regarding Foreign Credit Evaluation, contact Professor Vlad Dima or email us at fritdept@letsci.wisc.edu

Italian Undergraduate Courses

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Italian 101: First Semester Italian

Credits: 4 Contact: Loren Eadie

This 4-credit course is designed for students with little or no knowledge of the Italian language.  The goal is to provide an introduction to contemporary Italian language and culture.   You will be actively engaged in  activities such as:  role-plays, and pair and group work.  Listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills are integrated in all activities.  To facilitate acquisition of the target language, this course will be conducted in Italian.  Upon successful completion of this course you will be able to enroll in Italian 102. Open to Fr.

Italian 102: Second Semester Italian

Credits: 4 Contact: Loren Eadie

This 4-credit course is designed for students with some knowledge of the Italian language.  In this course, you will improve the skills gained in Italian 101 and learn new structures and expressions that will enable you to talk about past events, formulate plans for the future, express desires and opinions. Several workshops throughout the semester will improve your reading and writing skills.
You will be actively engaged in  activities such as:  role-plays, and pair and group work.  Listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills are integrated in all activities.  To facilitate acquisition of the target language, this course will be conducted in Italian.  Upon successful completion of this course you will be able to enroll in Italian 203.  Prerequisite: Italian 101 or 181 or 1 year HS Italian.  Open to Fr.

Italian 203: Third Semester Italian

Credits: 4 Contact: Loren Eadie

This 4-credit course is designed for students who have successfully completed Italian 102 or 201.  The goal of this course is to provide an in-depth understanding of contemporary Italian language and culture.  This course will advance spoken and written language skills developed in previous courses.  Pair and group work will provide you with numerous opportunities to interact with your classmates in Italian.  You will be actively engaged in activities that will enhance acquisition of the Italian language through advanced oral comprehension, conversation, reading and writing.  You will revise some grammatical structures covered in previous courses, and learn new advanced aspects of the language.  This course is conducted entirely in Italian.  Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to enroll in Italian 204.  Prerequisite: Italian 102 or 2 yrs HS Italian. Open to Fr.

Italian 204: Fourth Semester Italian

Credits: 4 Contact: Loren Eadie

This course (4 credits) is designed for students who have successfully completed Italian 203. It will advance spoken and written language skills developed in previous courses through a variety of oral and written exercises. The goal is to develop further oral and written proficiency in Italian. The skills acquired from this course are needed for higher-level language study and literature courses taught in Italian. It aims at understanding concrete and abstract discourse in a variety of tenses and moods; writing on a variety of topics in Italian using diversified vocabulary; reading and understanding authentic materials and literary texts; conversing at an intermediate-advanced level in Italian. The class will be conducted entirely in Italian. Prerequisite: Italian 203 or 3 yrs HS Italian.

Italian 312: Writing Workshop

Credits: 3 Contact: 

Continuation of 311. Development of composition and editing skills with focus on grammatical accuracy, conventions, and rhetorical techniques for organizing information, presenting coherent arguments, and appropriateness of language to topic.

Italian 322: Introduction to Italian Literature

Credits: 3 Contact: Patrick Rumble

Continuation of 321. From the end of the Renaissance to the twentieth century.

Italian 350: Rome: Changing Shape of a City

Credits: 3-4 Contact: Loren Eadie

Italian 429: Introduction to the Romance Languages

Credits: 3 Contact: Luis Tejedo-Herrero

Introduction to structural similarities and differences apparent in major Romance languages (French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish) and to their historical developments, with reference to basic linguistic features of each language: phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon. Does not count towards French major.

Italian 450: Special Topics in Italian Literature

Credits: 3 Contact: Grazia Menechella

Credits: 3 Contact: Professor Grazia Menechella

CIBO E LETTERATURA (1900-2021)

This course (taught in Italian) will focus on the representation of food in Italian literature in novels with recipes, recipes that are close to the genre of short stories, the Futurist cookbook and the Futurist Manifesto “Against Pasta”, a novel with food writer
Pellegrino Artusi as a clever detective, postcolonial fiction depicting a multicultural Italy at the table, women and food, mafia in the kitchen. Among the authors included are Pascoli, Marinetti- Fillìa, Tomasi di Lampedusa, Maraini, Calvino, Scego, Camilleri,
Mizzau, Malvaldi, Lakhous. The course will be structured like a seminar with weekly
discussion of the assigned material.

Italian 460: Italian Film

Credits: 3 Contact: Patrick Rumble

History of Italian Cinema

This course (taught in English) offers a survey of the history of Italian cinema from the
Second World War up to today, examining the work of key filmmakers in the Italian art
cinema tradition, including Rossellini, De Sice, Antonioni, Pasolini, Cavani, Bertolucci,
Fellini, Moretti, and Gioli. Students will be introduced to important film movements
and trends including Futurism, Neorealism, the Commedia all’italiana, Auteurist
cinema, Feminist filmmaking, Avant-Garde film and Environmental cinema.

Literature in Translation 253: Dante's Divine Comedy

Credits: 3 Contact: Jelena Todorović

Have you ever wondered about human nature? What is our place in this world? Through readings, videos, and original images, we will explore and discuss Dante’s answers from one of the greatest world literary classics, his Divine Comedy. From Hell, through Purgatory to Paradise, we will travel together with Dante in a universal tale of the journey of the human soul. Along the way, we will learn about Dante, his life and his works, development of literary history, historical and socio-political context of medieval Europe, the Mediterranean and the Middle East. We will make connections that cross today’s geographic and cultural lines in an exploration of literary topics, the history of ideas, and shared history, pondering universal concepts and patterns in the development of civilization that can still be observed today.

Literature in Translation 360: French and Italian Renaissance Literature Online

Credits: 3 Contact: 

A web-based course comprising 15 week-long units, organized as a virtual journey through Renaissance Italian and French cities. Each unit includes a lecture and readings from main literary texts and cultural documents associated with the city or region.

Pre-Reqs: None

Literature in Translation 410: Topics in Italian Literature

Credits: 3 Contact: Grazia Menechella

Treatment of a specific perific period, genre, theme or movement in Italian literature.

Enroll Info: So st

Academic Advisors in Italian 

ADVISING. FOR ANY QUESTIONS REGARDING OUR COURSES, PROGRAM, MAJOR, CERTIFICATE, ETC. CONTACT A FACULTY MEMBER OF THE ITALIAN ADVISING TEAM:

STUDY ABROAD. 

READY TO FILL OUT THE FORM TO DECLARE THE ITALIAN MAJOR OR THE ITALIAN CERTIFICATE? CONTACT SHAWN RAMER (ramer2@wisc.edu).

French Graduate Courses

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French 568: Materiality and Immateriality in sub-Saharan Africa

Credits: 3 Contact: Professor  Vlad Dima

This course explores representations of cultural artifacts (such as football jerseys), of immaterial beings (such as ghosts), and of philosophical ideas (such as Mbembe’s Afrique-qui-vient or “black reason”) across a variety of genres and mediums. The aim is to better understand the current state of African Subjectivity within the Global South, as well as within the North-South context. We will watch a number of contemporary films, read 21st century novels, engage with philosophy, theory, music, paintings, photography, and various diegetic objects.

French 821: Issues in Methods of Teaching French and Italian

Credits: 1-3 Contact: Professor Heather Willis Allen

This seminar facilitates the development of expertise in teaching content courses (e.g., of culture and literature) in a foreign language (FL) and assessing student learning in such courses. This seminar takes as its fundamental concepts the notions of multiliteracies and design as defined by New Literacy Studies scholars. Course topics include:

  • identifying challenges and opportunities in U.S. collegiate FL programs today
  • developing an understanding of multiliteracies pedagogy
  • rethinking the teaching of reading and literature
  • facilitating writing development through genre
  • developing an understanding of intercultural competence
  • facilitating the development of visual and new media literacies
  • rethinking assessment of student learning in advanced collegiate FL courses
  • learning how to design an advanced collegiate FL course

The final month of FRE 821 is dedicated to each course participant designing his or her own advanced collegiate FL course syllabus and sample materials for that course with class time dedicated to workshopping and presenting work-in-progress. FRE 821 is taught in English and course participation is open to graduate students in any language department, SLA majors, and SLA minors. Variable credit is available (1 credit or 3 credits).

French 825: Cours de Grammaire et de Style

Credits: 3 Contact: Professor Martine Debaisieux

L’objectif de ce séminaire est d’enrichir votre expression écrite, tout en acquérant une compréhension plus nuancée du fonctionnement de la langue française. Vous aurez l’occasion d’approfondir votre connaissance des complexités grammaticales, d’élargir votre lexique, et de raffiner votre style au moyen d’exercices d’analyse littéraire ou d’écriture créative. Nous examinerons également des notions fondamentales de stylistique comparée (anglais-français) pour aborder la pratique de la traduction.

Ce séminaire est fondé sur un travail régulier d’écriture individuelle et collaborative. Il permettra une amélioration de votre expression écrite en termes de clarté, de nuance et d’efficacité, en particulier dans son application à l’analyse et à l’argumentation. Il vous donnera aussi l’occasion d’apprendre à mieux évaluer et réviser votre travail.

French 948: Seminar: Questions de Littérature

Credits: 3 Contact: Richard Goodkin

Balzac and Theatricality: Intermodal Readings.

In this seminar, we will explore the importance of theater for the narrative works of Honoré de Balzac. We will approach the question of theatricality in several complementary ways: as an organizing principle of selected works from the Comédie humaine, such as the implicit or explicit “five-act” structures of French Classical theater (Père Goriot, Le Médecin de campagne); as a deep-seated impulse of Balzac’s own literary production; as the basis for intertexts ranging from Balzac and Racine to Balzac and Shakespeare; as a means of exploring questions of theatrical genres, particularly comedy vs. tragedy; and as a pathway into questions of perspective and person, such as theatrical and dialogic exchange vs. narrative.

Italian Graduate Courses

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Italian 450: Special Topics: Italian Literature

Credits: 3 Contact: Professor Grazia Menechella

CIBO E LETTERATURA (1900-2021)

This course (taught in Italian) will focus on the representation of food in Italian literature in novels with recipes, recipes that are close to the genre of short stories, the Futurist cookbook and the Futurist Manifesto “Against Pasta”, a novel with food writer
Pellegrino Artusi as a clever detective, postcolonial fiction depicting a multicultural Italy at the table, women and food, mafia in the kitchen. Among the authors included are Pascoli, Marinetti- Fillìa, Tomasi di Lampedusa, Maraini, Calvino, Scego, Camilleri,
Mizzau, Malvaldi, Lakhous. The course will be structured like a seminar with weekly
discussion of the assigned material.

Italian 460: Italian Film

Credits: 3 Contact: Professor Patrick Rumble

History of Italian Cinema

This course (taught in English) offers a survey of the history of Italian cinema from the
Second World War up to today, examining the work of key filmmakers in the Italian art
cinema tradition, including Rossellini, De Sice, Antonioni, Pasolini, Cavani, Bertolucci,
Fellini, Moretti, and Gioli. Students will be introduced to important film movements
and trends including Futurism, Neorealism, the Commedia all’italiana, Auteurist
cinema, Feminist filmmaking, Avant-Garde film and Environmental cinema.

Italian 731: Autobiografi e lettori del Settecento

Credits: 3 Contact: Professor Stefania Buccini

This graduate course is designed to analyze eighteenth-century reading methods and
techniques through a close examination of selected forms of life writing
(autobiographies and memoirs) composed between 1728 and 1803, two important
chronological markers that respectively reflect the publication of Giambattista Vico’s
Vita and Vittorio Alfieri’s Vita. Reading practices will be revisited in a historical and
cultural context and special focus will be placed on how specific authors followed,
challenged and, occasionally, subverted contemporary canons. The contribution of
graduate students will consist of an oral presentation and a research paper.

Italian 952: Seminar: Studies in Italian Literature

Credits: 3 Contact: Professor Patrick Rumble

Pier Paolo Pasolini

This graduate seminar will focus on the cinematic, literary, and theoretical contributions
of Pier Paolo Pasolini (1922-1975). Open to graduate students only.

French 821: Issues in Methods of Teaching French and Italian

Credits: 1-3 Contact: Professor Heather Willis Allen

This seminar facilitates the development of expertise in teaching content courses (e.g., of culture and literature) in a foreign language (FL) and assessing student learning in such courses. This seminar takes as its fundamental concepts the notions of multiliteracies and design as defined by New Literacy Studies scholars. Course topics include:

  • identifying challenges and opportunities in U.S. collegiate FL programs today
  • developing an understanding of multiliteracies pedagogy
  • rethinking the teaching of reading and literature
  • facilitating writing development through genre
  • developing an understanding of intercultural competence
  • facilitating the development of visual and new media literacies
  • rethinking assessment of student learning in advanced collegiate FL courses
  • learning how to design an advanced collegiate FL course

The final month of FRE 821 is dedicated to each course participant designing his or her own advanced collegiate FL course syllabus and sample materials for that course with class time dedicated to workshopping and presenting work-in-progress. FRE 821 is taught in English and course participation is open to graduate students in any language department, SLA majors, and SLA minors. Variable credit is available (1 credit or 3 credits).