Department of French and Italian

College of Letters & Science

Courses in Italian

For a complete listing of sections and times, consult the Schedule of Classes.

Semester: Fall 2017

Credits: 4 Contact: Loren Eadie

This 4-credit course is designed for students with little or no knowledge of the Italian language.  The goal is to provide an introduction to contemporary Italian language and culture.   You will be actively engaged in  activities such as:  role-plays, and pair and group work.  Listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills are integrated in all activities.  To facilitate acquisition of the target language, this course will be conducted in Italian.  Upon successful completion of this course you will be able to enroll in Italian 102. Open to Fr.

Credits: 4 Contact: Loren Eadie
This 4-credit course is designed for students with some knowledge of the Italian language.  In this course, you will improve the skills gained in Italian 101 and learn new structures and expressions that will enable you to talk about past events, formulate plans for the future, express desires and opinions. Several workshops throughout the semester will improve your reading and writing skills.
 
You will be actively engaged in  activities such as:  role-plays, and pair and group work.  Listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills are integrated in all activities.  To facilitate acquisition of the target language, this course will be conducted in Italian.  Upon successful completion of this course you will be able to enroll in Italian 203.  Prerequisite: Italian 101 or 181 or 1 year HS Italian.  Open to Fr.
Credits: 4 Contact: Loren Eadie

This 4-credit course is designed for students with little or no knowledge of the Italian language, but who have a strong background in another Romance language (i.e. Spanish, French, Rumanian, Portuguese, Catalan, etc.).  Italian 201 is an accelerated course that combines Italian 101 and 102 in 1 semester. The goal of this course is to provide an introduction to contemporary Italian language and culture.  In this course, you will learn to talk about present and past events, formulate plans for the future, express desires and opinions. Several workshops throughout the semester will develop your reading and writing skills.  You will be actively engaged in  activities such as:  role-plays, and pair and group work.  Listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills are integrated in all activities. To facilitate acquisition of the target language, this course will be conducted entirely in Italian.    Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to sign up for Italian 203.   Students cannot receive credit for 201 after taking Italian 101 or 102.  Prerequisite:  4 semesters (or equivalent proficiency) in another Romance language, or consent of instructor.

Credits: 4 Contact: Loren Eadie

This 4-credit course is designed for students who have successfully completed Italian 102 or 201.  The goal of this course is to provide an in-depth understanding of contemporary Italian language and culture.  This course will advance spoken and written language skills developed in previous courses.  Pair and group work will provide you with numerous opportunities to interact with your classmates in Italian.  You will be actively engaged in activities that will enhance acquisition of the Italian language through advanced oral comprehension, conversation, reading and writing.  You will revise some grammatical structures covered in previous courses, and learn new advanced aspects of the language.  This course is conducted entirely in Italian.  Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to enroll in Italian 204.  Prerequisite: Italian 102 or 2 yrs HS Italian. Open to Fr.

Credits: 4 Contact: Loren Eadie

This course (4 credits) is designed for students who have successfully completed Italian 203. It will advance spoken and written language skills developed in previous courses through a variety of oral and written exercises. The goal is to develop further oral and written proficiency in Italian. The skills acquired from this course are needed for higher-level language study and literature courses taught in Italian. It aims at understanding concrete and abstract discourse in a variety of tenses and moods; writing on a variety of topics in Italian using diversified vocabulary; reading and understanding authentic materials and literary texts; conversing at an intermediate-advanced level in Italian. The class will be conducted entirely in Italian. Prerequisite: Italian 203 or 3 yrs HS Italian.

Credits: 3 Contact: Patrick Rumble

Survey of Italian history, literature, cinema, art, politics, and general culture from the Risorgimento to the present. Prerequisites: Italian 204 or consent of instructor. 

Credits: 3 Contact: Patrick Rumble

Conducted in Italian, Italian 230 is a survey of Italian history, literature, cinema, art, politics, and general culture from the Risorgimento to the present.  Prerequisites: Italian 204 or consent of instructor.

Credits: 3 Contact: Kristin Phillips-Court

For students with language proficiency and graduate students who wish to acquire a reading knowledge of Italian. Intensive grammar; readings from appropriate texts in the humanities, sciences and social sciences. Gives no language credit.

Credits: 3 Contact: Ernesto Livorni

Advanced Italian Language is a 3-credit course conducted in Italian that focuses on the development of accurate and nuanced capacity for expression in Italian and for understanding the spoken and written language.  The course will also address Italian phonetics to develop accurate pronunciation. Prerequisites:  Italian 204 or consent of instructor. 

Credits: 3 Contact: Jelena Todorović

This course will focus on the theme of love in Medieval and Early Modern Italy, and on the ways in which this period laid a foundation of the way in which we today understand and live love. We will concentrate on the earliest masterpieces of Italian literature and culture, and examine Medieval and Early Modern literature and the ways in which it encompassed science, medicine, culture, law, gender. Prerequisites: Italian 204 or consent of instructor

Credits: 3 Contact: Ernesto Livorni

The course will focus on the discussion of major literary texts of Verismo, the Italian literary trend loosely corresponding to what in French is called Naturalism in a period (the second half of the nineteenth century) that may be epistemologically called the era of Positivism. Topics that will be discussed are: the poetics and ideology of Verismo; relationships with other literary trends (Romanticism, Naturalism, Scapigliatura) and arts (painting, photography, music); intersections of literary genres. Readings will include Giovanni Verga, Luigi Capuana, Matilde Serao, Federico De Roberto. This course will count toward the Italian Major and Certificate.

Credits: 3 Contact: Stefania Buccini

This course offers a survey of seventeenth-century Italian literature and examines the development of specific literary genres in the contexts of cultural and intellectual history. It provides methodologies and philological instruments necessary to the critical reading of a variety of narrative and poetic texts in the perspective of literary and cultural cross-currents of this time period. Special attention will be devoted to the nature and function of the early baroque novel and poetry, Counter-Reformation oratory, libertine fiction and ideology. Textual analysis will be conducted also on seventeenth-century printed editions with the purpose of allowing the students to familiarize themselves with the typographic characteristics and oddities of antique books. The contribution of graduate students will consist of an oral presentation and a critical essay.

Credits: 3 Contact: Kristin Phillips-Court

Tasso and the Late Renaissance. Within the context of the late-16th-century ‘age of criticism’ Tasso’s epic poem celebrates the First Crusade, the rise of the new imperial vision of the West, and its discontents.  This seminar focuses primarily on a close reading of Torquato Tasso’s Jerusalem Delivered but will include other works. Students will bring to their reading contemporaneous debates regarding the nature of imitation, whether art and poetry were meant to teach or to please, artistic decorum and Church reform, the role of the imagination in visual and literary arts, genre, and political ideology.  Requirements: familiarity Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso and earlier (Homeric, Virgilian, Medieval) epic traditions. 

Credits: 3 Contact: Patrick Rumble

This 3-credit course will offer a general introduction to the modern Italian novel (in translation) in philosophical, artistic, and historical context.  Students will be introduced to several of the most significant literary authors and movements in Italy during the 20th – 21st Century, and they will gain a broad understanding of modern Italian culture, history and society.  The central themes of the course include: modernism and postmodernism, immigration and nationalism, Futurism and Italian avant-gardes, fascism and anti-fascism, Feminism and gender in Italy, terrorism and political extremism, Mafia and anti-Mafia, and the impact of globalization on contemporary Italy. Taught in English. 

Credits: 3 Contact: Jelena Todorović

This is a COMM-B course. Have you ever wondered how it was to live during the Black Death? What was society like in the Middle Ages? How did these people lay foundation of today’s society we live in? Were they really very different from us, or do we share common everyday challenges? What can we learn from them? And, if we could, what could we teach them? We will ask and answer these questions while reading one of the world’s greatest literary classics, Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron, a text that will make us both laugh and cry. The course will investigate literature, art, pop culture, music, politics, religion, interpersonal and transcultural relations, warfare, fashion, gender roles, and everyday life of our medieval and early modern ancestors through a variety of sources (from medieval written accounts to the twentieth-century feminist response to the representation of women, from medieval frescoes to film and Internet, etc.).

Credits: 3 Contact: Stefania Buccini

This 3-credit course will explore the central role played by Italy in the Western European vision of the Americas from Columbus' voyages to World War II. Students will have the opportunity to deepen their understanding of a broad variety of works from the late 1500s through the 1950s. Lit Trans 260 provides students with or without an Italian heritage with a unique opportunity to revisit the issue of cultural identity through literary, historical and visual texts.